Child-free flights? Malaysia Airlines bans children from upper deck of its A380s

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It is the kind of decision that will be music to the ears of adult air passengers - but could irritate families who are travelling together.
Malaysia Airlines has decided to ban children from the top deck of its A380 planes, so that adults can travel in peace without ear-piercing screams.
The carrier's modern double-decker aircraft will impose an age-limit on the whole upper floor, banning children under 12 years of age from being seated there.

 
Child on a plane

Separation: Malaysia Airlines has taken the controversial decision to ban children from first class and one floor of its new planes

The top deck holds around 70 economy class and 66 business class seats, while first class is situated on the lower deck.

The airline has already confirmed that babies will not be welcome in its first class cabin.

Malaysia Airlines CEO Tengku Azmil confirmed on Twitter that the carrier received 'many' complaints from passengers who fork out for the expensive tickets, but then can't sleep due to crying children.

The decision means families travelling with children will only be able to sit in the economy section of the lower deck, leaving the front of the plane and the whole upper deck for adults and older children only.


Malaysia Airlines' first A380 service will be between Kuala Lumpur and London, with a second route to Sydney set to launch in September.

The news of a child-free section of the plane first emerged in the publication Australian Business Traveler, which reported that travel agents had been told 'passengers accompanying children under 12 years old age will be excluded from booking these seats.'

The decision was then confirmed by the airline, which claimed that the 350-seat economy zone on the lower deck is being branded as child-friendly, with facilities to suit families. These include eight toilets and its own entrance, separate to that used by the upper deck.

It is not just Malaysia Airlines' A380s that are catering to adult passengers.

The first class section on its 747s has also been altered so that it can no longer take travel cots, effectively making it a baby-free section.

But while some have called the decision discriminatory, others have defended the move, saying it is no different to quiet carriages on trains.

Suzanne Rowan Kelleher, editor-in-chief of WeJustGotBack.com, told America's Today Travel: 'My guess is that many parents would opt for kid-free zones on planes when they're traveling without their children.'

The controversial decision comes just days after Canadian airline WestJet released a spoof video for April Fools' Day advertising a 'Kargo Kids' service, which places children in the hold along with the luggage, to enable a peaceful flight for adults.


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  • Strawberrylittle
    That's not right. It is discriminatory and old school.